mc.table~ Reference

Signal Table Lookup (multichannel)

mc.table~

Description

Use table~ to remap incoming signal values with a table object.

Arguments

None.

Attributes

embed [int] (default: 1)

When the embed attribute is enabled, table values are saved in a patcher file and restored when it is reopened.

extend [int]

The extend attribute controls how table~ responds when an input index value (either signal or float) is less than zero or greater than the table size.

Possible values:

0 = 'Zero' ( Output zero )
When extend is Zero (0), a zero signal is output when the index is outside the table bounds.

1 = 'Extend' ( Output lowest or highest table values )
When extend is set to Extend (1), table~ outputs the value at index 0 is output when the input index less than zero. It outputs the value at the highest table index is when the input index is greater than the table size.

2 = 'Wrap' ( Wrap index )
When extend is set to Wrap (2), table~ performs a modulo operation on the input index. Example: if the table size is 128 and the input is 130, the value at index 2 (130 mod 128) will be output.

3 = 'Ignore' ( Don't change output )
When extend is set to Ignore (3), any input index outside the table size is ignored and does not change the output.

inmap [atom]

The inmap attribute specifies a range of input samples to map to table indices. For instance if your input signal will be between 0 and 1, you can use an inmap of 0 1, which will scale to the current size of the table. If the table changes size, the current input map adjusts automatically. To clear the current inmap, use a value of none or 0 0.

inputmode [int]

Input Mode

Possible values:

0 = 'Lookup'
1 = 'Increment Index'
2 = 'Random Distribution'

interp [int]

The interp attribute determines how input values between integer table indices produce output.

Possible values:

0 = 'None' ( Truncate Index )
When interp is set to None (0), an incoming value is truncated to its integer value before the lookup. No interpolation is performed.

1 = 'Linear' ( Linear Interpolation )
When interp is set to Linear (1), the output for any input value between two table indices is linearly interpolated between the table values at those two indices. For example, an input of 1.5 -- with table values of 5 at index 1 and 10 at index 2 -- produces an output of 7.5.

2 = 'Round' ( Round Index )
When interp is set to Round (2), an incoming value is rounded to the nearest integer value before the lookup. No interpolation is performed.

name [symbol]

The name attribute permits table data to be shared among multiple table objects (table~, table, or itable) with the same name. Changing the name switches the table used for lookup.

outscale [atom]

The outscale attribute specifies a range of output samples. The current range of the table will map to the specified range. For example, if you want the output of table~ to range from 0 - 1, set outscale to 0 1. The output scaling adjusts automatically to keep output values in the specified range even if the table range changes. To clear the current outscale use a value of none or 0 0.

parameter_enable [int]

Enables use of this object with Max for Live Parameters.

parameter_mappable [int] (default: 1)

When parameter_mappable is enabled, the object will be available for mapping to keyboard or MIDI input using the Mappings feature. (default = 1).

range [int]

Sets the range of table values. If the signed attribute is not enabled, the maximum table value is one less than the range. For example if the range is 128, table values range from 0 to 127. If signed is enabled, table values range from +/- the range value. For example if the range is 128, table values will be -128 to 128.

signed [int] (default: 0)

If the signed attribute is enabled, table values range from +/- the range value. For example if the range is 128, table values will be -128 to 128. Changing the state of signed attribute does not modify table values.

size [int]

Sets the number of elements in the table. Indices range from 0 to one less than the size.

triggermode [int]

Trigger Mode

Possible values:

0 = 'Zero to Non-Zero'
1 = 'Change'

Common Box Attributes

annotation [symbol]

Sets the text that will be displayed in the Clue window when the user moves the mouse over the object.

background [int] (default: 0)

Adds or removes the object from the patcher's background layer. background 1 adds the object to the background layer, background 0 removes it. Objects in the background layer are shown behind all objects in the default foreground layer.

color [4 floats]

Sets the color for the object box outline.

fontface [int]

Sets the type style used by the object. The options are:

plain
bold
italic
bold italic

Possible values:

0 = 'regular'
1 = 'bold'
2 = 'italic'
3 = 'bold italic'

fontname [symbol]

Sets the object's font.

fontsize [float]

Sets the object's font size (in points).

Possible values:

'8'
'9'
'10'
'11'
'12'
'13'
'14'
'16'
'18'
'20'
'24'
'30'
'36'
'48'
'64'
'72'

hidden [int] (default: 0)

Toggles whether an object is hidden when the patcher is locked.

hint [symbol]

Sets the text that will be displayed in as a pop-up hint when the user moves the mouse over the object in a locked patcher.

ignoreclick [int] (default: 0)

Toggles whether an object ignores mouse clicks in a locked patcher.

jspainterfile [symbol]

JS Painter File

patching_rect [4 floats] (default: 0. 0. 100. 0.)

Sets the position and size of the object in the patcher window.

position [2 floats]

g/s(set)

Sets the object's x and y position in both patching and presentation modes (if the object belongs to its patcher's presentation), leaving its size unchanged.

presentation [int] (default: 0)

Sets whether an object belongs to the patcher's presentation.

presentation_rect [4 floats] (default: 0. 0. 0. 0.)

Sets the x and y position and width and height of the object in the patcher's presentation, leaving its patching position unchanged.

rect [4 floats]

g/s(set)

Sets the x and y position and width and height of the object in both patching and presentation modes (if the object belongs to its patcher's presentation).

size [2 floats]

g/s(set)

Sets the object's width and height in both patching and presentation modes (if the object belongs to its patcher's presentation), leaving its position unchanged.

textcolor [4 floats]

Sets the color for the object's text in RGBA format.

textjustification [int]

Sets the justification for the object's text.

Possible values:

0 = 'left'
1 = 'center'
2 = 'right'

varname [symbol]

Sets the patcher's scripting name, which can be used to address the object by name in pattr, scripting messages to thispatcher, and the js object.

Multichannel Group Attributes

chans [int]

The chans attribute sets the number of channels and instances in the MC wrapper object. To define a fixed number of channels regardless of what is connected to the object, set chans via a typed-in argument, for example typing mc.cycle~ @chans 100 would create 100 instances of a cycle~ object inside the MC wrapper. If chans is 0, the wrapper object will auto-adapt to the number of channels in its input multichannel signals (using the maximum of all connected signals). If an object does not have any multichannel signals connected to its inlets, the chans attribute will need to have a non-zero value if you want more than one instance.

If chans is changed while the audio is on, the number of instances will not change until audio is restarted. However, if chans is reduced while the audio is on, any extra channels will no longer process audio and will output a zero signal.

initialvalues [list]

The initialvalues attribute only applies to object creation time so it must be set via a typed-in argument. initialvalues sets the first (and only the first) initial argument for successive instances in the MC wrapper. For example, typing mc.cycle~ @chans 4 @initialvalues 50 60 70 80 would assign an initial frequency to the cycle~ instances inside the wrapper. The first instance would be assigned a frequency of 50, the second a frequency of 60, the third 70, and the fourth 80. Note that initialvalues does not determine the actual instance count; this can be done using the chans attribute. If there are more instances than elements for the initialvalues attribute, those instances are instantiated with the default value.

To set a default value of an argument for all instances, type it as an argument before any typed-in attributes. For example, modifying our example above: mc.cycle~ 100 @chans 10 @initialvalues 50 60 70 80. In this example, the first four instances are set as before, but the next six are created with a frequency argument of 100.

To change instance values or attributes after the wrapper object has been created, use the setvalue, applyvalues, or replicatevalues messages.

values [list]

You can use values as an alternate name for the initialvalues attribute.

target [int]

The target attribute sets an index for targeting specific wrapper instances. Subsequent messages are directed to an individual instance instead of all instances. It is strongly recommended you use the more reliable setvalue message instead of the target attribute. The voice index of setvalue will override the current setting of target. When target is 0, incoming messages are sent to all instances. When target is -1, incoming messages do nothing. Note that target only affects messages, not setting attribute values.

usebusymap [int]

When usebusymap is enabled, the MC wrapper controls whether individual instances process audio using a busy map maintained by either an mc.noteallocator~ or mc.voiceallocator~ object. When a channel in the busy map is marked as "free" or "released" no audio processing occurs by any instance on the channel corresponding to the voice index. When usebusymap is disabled, instances in the MC wrapper process audio at all times. This will also be true if usebusymap is enabled and there is no local or named busy map available. (See the busymapname attribute for a description of local and named busy maps). For brevity the name bz can also be used.

zero [int]

When the zero attribute is enabled, channels in the MC wrapper due to the use of a busy map output zero signals. To save a small amount of CPU at the risk of loud and unpleasant noises due to uncleared signal data, you can disable zero. In this case, disabled channels in the MC wrapper do nothing to their output channels. If usebusymap is disabled or there is no active local or named busy map available, the setting of the zero attribute has no effect.

Conveniently, when usebusymap is enabled in mc.mixdown~ object, disabled channels are not mixed to the output. When unused signals from wrapped objects with zero disabled feed into mc.mixdown~, they will be ignored, reducing the risk of unpleasantness getting past the mix output.

busymapname [symbol]

When the usebusymap attribute is enabled, an MC wrapper object uses the local busy map of any mc.voiceallocator~ or mc.noteallocator~ in the same patcher by default. To use a named global busy map instead, set the busymapname attribute to the desired name. For brevity the name @bzname can also be used.

op [symbol]

Sets the function that will be used when the generate message is set. If you use attrui set to edit the op attribute, you can see a handy menu of the 40+ possible functions, so you don't have to memorize their names.

voiceprob [float]

The voiceprob attribute is used when employing the $ or * arguments to the setvalue message. It determines the probability that the setvalue message will be sent. For example, if voiceprob is 0.9, there is a 90% chance the setvalue message will be sent to a randomly chosen voice.

Parameter Attributes

Order

Typeint

Sets the order of recall of this parameter. Lower numbers are recalled first. The order of recall of parameters with the same order number is undefined.

Parameter Mode Enable

Typeint

Parameter Mode Enable (not available from Parameters window)

Link to Scripting Name

Typeint

When checked, the Scripting Name is linked to the Long Name attribute.

Long Name

Typesymbol

The long name of the parameter. This name must be unique per patcher hierarchy.

Short Name

Typesymbol

Sets the short name for the object's visual display. The maximum length varies according to letter width, but is generally in a range of 5 to 7 characters.

Type

Typeint

Specifies the data type. The data types used in Max for Live are:

Float
Int
Enum (enumerated list)
Blob

Note: By convention, the Live application uses floating point numbers for its calculations; the native integer representation is limited to 256 values, with a default range of 0-255 (similar to the char data type used in Jitter). When working with Live UI objects whose integer values will exceed this range, the Type attribute should be set to Float, and the Unit Style attribute should be set to Int.

Range/Enum

Typelist

When used with an integer or floating point data type, this field is used to specify the minimum and maximum values of the parameter.
When used with an enumerated list (Enum) data type, this field contains a space-delimited list of the enumerated values (if list items contain a space or special characters, the name should be enclosed in double quotes).

Modulation Mode

Typeint

Sets the Modulation Mode used by the Live application. The modulation modes are:

None
Unipolar
Bipolar
Additive
Absolute

Modulation Range

Typelist

This parameter is only used with the Absolute modulation mode. It specifies defines the range of values used.

Initial Enable

Typeint

When checked (set to 1), the UI object can store an initialization value. The value is set using the Initial attribute (see below).

Initial

Typelist

Sets the initial value to be stored and used when the Initial Enable attribute is checked.

Unit Style

Typeint

Sets the unit style to be used when displaying values. The unit style values are: Int: displays integer values
Float: displays floating point values
Time: displays time values in milliseconds (ms)
Hertz: displays frequency values (Hz/kHz).
deciBel: displays loudness (dB)
%: Percentage
Pan: displays Left and Right values
Semitones: displays steps (st)
MIDI: displays pitch corresponding to the MIDI note number
Custom: displays custom data type
Native: defaults to floating point values

Custom Units

Typesymbol

Sets the units to be used with the 'Custom' unit style (see "Unit Style", above). Custom unit strings may be simple symbols (e.g. "Harmonic(s)"), in which case the parameter's value will be displayed in its 'Native' display mode, followed by the symbol (e.g. "12 Harmonic(s)" for an Int-typed parameter or "12.54 Harmonic(s)" for a Float-typed parameter). For additional control over the numerical component displayed, a sprintf-style string may be used (e.g. "%0.2f Bogon(s)", which would display a value such as ".87 Bogons").

Exponent

Typefloat

When set to a value other than 1., the parameter's input and output values will be exponentially scaled according to the factor entered in this column.

Steps

Typeint

The number of steps available between the minimum and maximum values of a parameter. For instance, if the parameter has a range from 0.-64., with Steps set to 4, the user can only set the parameter to 0, 21.33, 42.66 and 64.

Parameter Visibility

Typeint

For automatable parameters (Int, Float, Enum), 'Stored Only' disables automation, although parameter values are stored in presets. 'Hidden' causes the parameter's value to be ignored when storing and recalling data. Non-automatable parameters (Blob) are 'Stored Only' by default, and can be set to 'Hidden', if desired.

Update Limit (ms)

Typeint

Speed limits values triggered by automation.

Defer Automation Output

Typeint

Defers values triggered by automation.

Messages

bang

The bang message treats the table as a probability distribution and outputs a signal corresponding to a randomly chosen index within the table. A location in the table with a higher value is more likely to have its index selected.

int

See description for float

float

When a signal is not connected to the inlet of table~, a number sets the index to use for table lookup output. If the number contains a fractional part and interp is set to Linear, the output will be interpolated between two table values. The number is also mapped to an index according to the current setting of the inmap attribute and the table value is scaled according to the outscale attribute.

(mouse)

Double-clicking on a table~ object opens a window where you can edit the values of the lookup table.

goto

The word goto, followed by a table index, sets the next table index used by either the prev or next messages as they increment or decrement through the table. Unlike a float or int, goto itself does not change the output of the table~ object and its index is not modified by the inmap attribute.

next

When a signal is not connected to the inlet of table~, the next message adds one to the most recent table index set by the int, or float, then causes the table~ to output the value at this index as a signal. If a goto message immediately preceded next, the value at the specified index is output. Note that next does not force the table index to an integer value, so it preserves any fractional part of the index caused by a previous float message. When next increments the index and it is larger than the table size, it wraps around to zero.

prev

When a signal is not connected to the inlet of table~, the prev message subtracts one from the most recent table index set by the int, or float, then causes the table~ to output the value at this index as a signal. If a goto message immediately preceded prev, the value at the specified index is output. Note that prev does not force the table index to an integer value, so it preserves any fractional part of the index caused by a previous float message. When prev decrements the index and it becomes less than zero, it will wrap around to the end of the table.

signal

Incoming signal values are used as indices for table lookup.

Multichannel Group Messages

deviate

Arguments

range [float]
message-name [symbol]
center-value [float]
upper-range [float]
Generate a random value for each channel around a center value. An optional number after the center value specifies the upper range size so it can be different from the lower range size.
Example: deviate 100 cutoff 1000 will generate random values for the cutoff attribute of the objects in the wrapper centered around 1000 Hz (between 900 and 1100 Hz). deviate 100 1000 200 sends float messages to the objects in the wrapper with random values between 900 and 1200.
If no message name is provided, a float message is used by default.

exponential

Arguments

exponent [float]
message-name [symbol]
multiplier [float]
The exponential message generates an exponential series. The first argument is N and the second (optional) argument is K in the following expression:
K * exp(-1 * N * channel) where channel starts 0 for the first channel
If the second argument is not present the default value is 1. Example: exponential 1 10 would generate, for four channels, values of 10, 3.678, 1.353, and 0.498. exponential -1 2 would generate 2, 5.437, 14.78, and 40.17.
If no message name is provided, a float message is used by default.

scaledexponential

Arguments

exponent [float]
message-name [symbol]
base [float]
The scaledexponential message generates an exponential series with the exponent scaled by the total numbher of channels. The first argument is N and the second (optional) argument is K in the following expression:
K * exp(-1 * N * (channel / num_channels) where channel starts 0 for the first channel
If the second argument is not present the default value is 1. Example: exponential -1 2 would generate, for six channels, values of 2, 2.363, 2.791, 3.297, 3.895, 4.602. scaledexponential -1 2 for four channels would generate 2, 2.568, 3.297, 4.324. scaledexponential provides a way to keep the range of the exponential series roughly the same independent of the number of channels.
If no message name is provided, a float message is used by default.

increment

Arguments

increment-amount [float]
message-name [symbol]
start-value [float]
The increment message generates a range of increasing values for each channel. The range starts at the second argument and increments each channel's value by the first argument. If no message name is provided then a float message is used by default.
Example: increment 5 2 for four channels would generate 2, 7, 12, and 17.
If no message name is provided, a float message is used by default.

harmonic

Arguments

multiplier [float]
message-name [symbol]
fundamental [float]
The harmonic message generate a harmonic series using the second argument as the fundamental frequency ( F ) and the first argument as a multiplier ( N ) in the following expression:
F * (1 + N * channel)
Example: harmonic 1 440 for five channels would generate 440, 880, 1320, 1760, and 2200. harmonic 0.5 440 for four channels would generate 440, 660, 880, and 1100.
If no message name is provided, a float message is used by default.

subharmonic

Arguments

multiplier [float]
message-name [symbol]
fundamental [float]
The subharmonic message generates a subharmonic series using the second argument as the fundamental frequency ( F ) and the first argument as a multiplier ( N ) in the following expression:
F / (1 + N * channel)
Example: subharmonic 1 440 for five channels would generate 440, 220, 146.7, and 110.
If no message name is provided, a float message is used by default.

spread

Arguments

boundary-value [float]
message-name [symbol]
other-boundary-value [float]
The spread message generates a range of values distributed to each channel. The first boundary value is included in the range outputs, but the second boundary value is not (see spreadinclusive, spreadexclusive, and spreadincludesecond for other options).
Example: spread 0 10 for four channels would generate 0, 2.5, 5, and 7.5.
If no message name is provided, a float message is used by default.

spreadinclusive

Arguments

boundary-value [float]
message-name [symbol]
other-boundary-value [float]
The spreadinclusive message generates a range of values distributed to each channel. Both the first and second boundary values are included in the range outputs.
Example: spreadinclusive 0 10 for four channels would generate 0, 3.33, 6.66, and 10.
If no message name is provided, a float message is used by default.

spreadexclusive

Arguments

boundary-value [float]
message-name [symbol]
other-boundary-value [float]
The spreadexclusive message generates a range of values distributed to each channel. Neither the first and second boundary values are included in the range outputs.
Example: spreadexclusive 0 10 for four channels would generate 2, 4, 6, and 8.
If no message name is provided, a float message is used by default.

spreadincludefirst

Arguments

boundary-value [float]
message-name [symbol]
other-boundary-value [float]
The spreadincludefirst message generates a range of values distributed to each channel. It is the same as the spread message. The first boundary value is included in the range outputs, but the second boundary value is not.
Example: spreadincludefirst 0 10 for four channels would generate 0, 2.5, 5, and 7.5.
If no message name is provided, a float message is used by default.

spreadincludesecond

Arguments

boundary-value [float]
message-name [symbol]
other-boundary-value [float]
The spreadincludefirst message generates a range of values distributed to each channel. It is the same as the spread message. The first boundary value is not included in the range outputs, but the second boundary value is included.
Example: spreadincludesecond 0 10 for four channels would generate 2.5, 5, 7.5, and 10.
If no message name is provided, a float message is used by default.

decide

Arguments

probability [float]
message-name [symbol]
value [float]
The decide message generates a uniformly distributed random value between 0 and 1 for each channel; if the value is less than the probability value set by the first argument, the second argument is assigned to the channel. If the random value is greater than the probability value, 0 is asigned to the channel. (If a second argument is not present, 1 is used by default.)
Example: decide 0 10 for four channels would generate 0, 0, 0, 0 because the probability of generating a 1 is zero. decide 0.5 10 could generate 10, 0, 0, 10 if the randomly generated values exceeded 0.5 for the first and fourth channels.
If no message name is provided, a float message is used by default.

randomrange

Arguments

low-value [float]
message-name [symbol]
high-value [float]
The randomrange message generates a uniformly distributed random range of values for all channels between the first argument and the second argument.
If no message name is provided, a float message is used by default.

generate

Arguments

low-value [float]
message-name [symbol]
high-value [float]
The generate message runs the function whose name is stored in the op attribute. Arguments passed to generate will be given to the function that is called. Example: if op is set to deviate, generate 50 440 is the same as sending the message deviate 50 440.

ease.linear

Arguments

low-value [float]
message-name [symbol]
high-value [float]
mid-point [float]
The MC wrapper provides access to the easing functions found in the Ease Package. These are accessed with message names consisting of ease. concatenated with the easing function name. For example, to use the in_out_circular function, send the message ease.in_out_circular.
The ease messages generate an non-linear and inclusive range of values across the space of channels. When you use two number arguments, the first value will be the low end of the range and the second will be the high end of the range. For in_ and in_out_ functions, this means the low end value will be set for the first channel and the high end will be set for the last channel. For out_ function variants, the high end will be set for the first channel and the low end will be set for the last channel.
When the ease messages are supplied with three numerical arguments, the first two specify the range as in the two-argument case, but the third argument, which will be constrained between 0 and 1, defines a mid point. Between the first channel and the channel closest to the mid point, the entire range of the function is applied. Between the mid point and the last channel, the range of the function is applied with the values reversed, creating a mirror image. The mirror image is exact when the third argument is 0.5, otherwise it will be biased toward 0 or 1. With a mid point of 1, the result is the same as if the third argument was not supplied at all. With a mid point of 0, the result is the same as if it was entirely reversed. In other words, it's as if the out_ version of the function were used instead of the in_ version that was originally specified -- or vice versa.
Available messages are: ease.linear, ease.in_back, ease.in_out_back, ease.out_back, ease.in_bounce, ease.in_out_bounce, ease.out_bounce, ease.in_circular, ease.in_out_circular, ease.out_circular, ease.in_cubic, ease.in_out_cubic, ease.out_cubic, ease.in_elastic, ease.in_out_elastic, ease.out_elastic, ease.in_exponential, ease.in_out_exponential, ease.out_exponential, ease.in_quadratic, ease.in_out_quadratic, ease.out_quadratic, ease.in_quartic, ease.in_out_quartic, ease.out_quartic, ease.in_quintic, ease.in_out_quintic, ease.out_quintic, ease.in_sine, ease.in_out_sine, and ease.out_sine. Refer to the Ease Package documentation for details on these functions and demonstrations of their behavior.
If no message name is provided, a float message is used by default.

smoothstep

Arguments

low-value [float]
message-name [symbol]
high-value [float]
mid-point [float]
The smoothstep function works analogously to the ease messages to generate an inclusive non-linear range of values, but uses the smoothstep function to generate a non-linear ramp. Refer to the documentation of the ease messages for more information.
If no message name is provided, a float message is used by default.

setvalue

Arguments

channel [int]
message [symbol]
message arguments [list]
The word setvalue, followed by both a channel index (starting at 1) and any message that can be sent to the wrapped object, sends the message to an individual instance within the MC wrapper. setvalue 0, followed by a message, sends the message to all instances. The setvalue message can be used in any inlet.
Instead of a number, the setvalue message can also take a symbol indicating that the target channel index should be randomly chosen:
  • setvalue * will choose a channel randomly but avoid duplicate choices until all channels have been chosen (similar to the Max urn object). Before chosing a channel, * will also decide whether to send the message according to the current value of the voiceprob attribute. If voiceprob is 0.1, there is a 10% chance of sending the message. If voiceprob is 0.9, there is a 90% chance of sending the message.
  • setvalue + will choose a channel randomly but avoid duplicate choices until all channels have been chosen (similar to the Max urn object). Unlike * it will always send the message.
  • setvalue $ will choose a channel randomly (similar to the Max random object). Before chosing a channel, $ will also decide whether to send the message according to the current value of the voiceprob attribute. If voiceprob is 0.1, there is a 10% chance of sending the message. If voiceprob is 0.9, there is a 90% chance of sending the message.
  • setvalue # will choose a channel randomly (similar to the Max random object). Unlike $ it will always send the message.

setvaluerange

Arguments

low channel [int]
high channel [int]
message [symbol]
message arguments [list]
The word setvaluerange, followed by a low and high channel index (starting at 1) and any message that can be sent to the wrapped object, sends the message to the specified range of channels.
Example: setvaluerange 1 4 50, sends the message 50 to channels 1 - 4. If the second argument is -1, the message is sent to all subsequent channels. For example, setvaluerange 2 -1 50 sends the message 50 to all channels between 2 and the current number of voices.
Note: the random channel selection feature using *, +, $, and # does not work with the setvaluerange message.

applymessages

Arguments

messages [list]
The word applymessages, followed by one or more numbers and/or symbols, sends individual messages successively to instances in the MC wrapper, starting with the first instance. For example, the message applymessages 0 bang will send the '0' message to the first instance, and the 'bang' message to the second instance. If there are more instances than arguments to applymessages, the extra instances are unaffected.

applyvalues

Arguments

message-name [symbol]
values [list]
The word applyvalues, followed by an optional message name and one or more message arguments, sends individual values in the arguments successively to instances in the MC wrapper, starting with the first instance. For example, the message applyvalues 4 5 6 will send 4 to the first instance, 5 to the second instance, and 6 to the third instance. If there are more instances than arguments to applyvalues, the extra instances are unaffected.

replicatevalues

Arguments

message-name [symbol]
values [list]
The word replicatevalues, followed by an optional message name and one or more message arguments, sends individual values in the arguments successively to instances in the MC wrapper, starting with the first instance. Unlike applyvalues, the replicatevalues message continues sending values to successive instances, restarting with the first element, if it runs out of arguments to send. For example, replicatevalues 4 5 to an MC wrapper object with three instances will send 4 to the first instance, 5 to the second instance, and 4 to the third instance.

applynvalues

Arguments

message [int]
values [list]
Whereas applyvalues can only set one value, the message applynvalues permits sending a message or setting an attribute with multiple values to instances in the MC wrapper, starting with the first instance. This is helpful for messages that require multiple values, such as the list message to wave~ to set start/end points. The message syntax is [applynvalues N value1, value2 etc.] where N is the number of values to set for each instance. For example, the message applynvalues 2 500 600 900 1000 will send 500 600 to the first instance and 900 1000 to the second instance. If there are more instances than specified in applynvalues, the extra instances are unaffected.

replicatenvalues

Arguments

message [int]
values [list]
Whereas replicatevalues can only set one value, the message replicatenvalues permits sending a message or setting an attribute with multiple values to instances in the MC wrapper, starting with the first instance. This is helpful for messages that require multiple values, such as the list message to wave~ to set start/end points. The message syntax is [replicatenvalues N value1, value2 etc.] where N is the number of values to set for each instance. Unlike applynvalues, the replicatenvalues message continues sending values to successive instances, restarting with the first group, if it runs out of arguments to send. For example, replicatenvalues 2 500 600 900 1000 to an MC wrapper object with three instances will send 500 600 to the first instance, 900 1000 to the second instance, and 500 600 to the third instance.

See Also

Name Description
buffer~ Store audio samples
index~ Read from a buffer~ with no interpolation
itable Data table editor
lookup~ Transfer function lookup table
table Store and edit an array of numbers